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What are Midwives? 





We meet people all the time who do not know what midwives are or that they are still practicing any longer. So I thought this could be an interesting page, and a great way to educate the public on the history of midwifery, both here in Florida and world wide, throughout time....let's get started. 

"A midwife is a professional in midwifery, specializing in pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum, women's sexual and reproductive health (including annual gynecological exams, family planning, menopausal care and others),
and newborn care.[1][2] They are also educated and trained to recognise the variations of normal progress of labor, and understand how to deal with deviations from normal. They may intervene in high risk situations such as breech births, twin births and births where the baby is in a posterior position, using non-invasive techniques. 

When a pregnant woman requires care beyond the midwife's scope of practice, they refer women to obstetricians or perinatologists who are medical specialists in complications related to pregnancy and birth, including surgical and instrumental deliveries.[3][4] In many parts of the world, these professions work in tandem to provide care to childbearing women. In others, only the midwife is available to provide care, and in yet other countries many women elect to utilize obstetricians primarily over midwives.

Many developing countries are investing money and training for midwives as these services are needed all over the world. Some primary care services are currently lacking due to the shortage of money being funded for these resources.[5][6]

A study performed by Melissa Cheyney and colleagues followed approximately 17,000 planned home births with the assistance of midwives. 93.6% of these families had a normal physiological birth and only 5% were Cesarean sections.[7] In 2013, the rate of Cesarean sections in hospitals in the United States was 32.7%, which is double the rate that World Health Organization recommends.[8]" 

In Florida, we have 4 types of midwives: 
Florida Licensed Midwives, Certified Professional Midwives, Certified Nurse Midwives, and Lay Midwives. In Florida, the first 3 are legal, licensed, and regulated by AHCA and Department of Health. Lay Midwifery is not legal here in Florida. 



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